19 July 2013

Ursel Benekendorff presents a photo study: 5 views from different perspectives of a single Lower Palaeolithic figurative stone


Ursel writes at her web site: The piece has a long cortical layer, which was included to represent a face image in a "spread-out wings". The figure turns his back to the viewer. The "shape" of this sculpture here offers a "backside view", presenting on an old cortex (wing) a facial impression.

A slight turn to the right makes it appear the bird's head silhouette. / A slight turn to the right shows the birds head in contour.

Parts of the back view of this type of bird are without cortex formation. Recording can be below the head appear as turned. Parts of the bird shows the cortex removed and turned slightly further, the images seem head to look over the shoulder?

A profile face with eye and nose hint shows up, looking to the right. Bottom photo shows the bird at full rotation now squatting from the front as in the upright pose. Another face, now in profile looking to the right appears to the viewer. The photo below shows the sculpture now turned presenting its front part. The birds seems to sit or has a resting position.

"Resting position" of the bird with one wing spread. Sitting bird with a wing

The images here are Copyright Ursel Benekendorff and may not copied or reproduced in any way. The photos and captions are by Ursel Benekendorff and used here with permission for purposes of linking to her web site, This web site schafftwissen.de has over 2000 photographs of sculptures and figures representing the largest collection of iconographic artifacts available for viewing on the internet.

German figure at left, ca. 475,000 BP, and Dutch figure featured two posts ago, ca. 7,000 BP. This comparison demonstrates the sense of art of our genus was in full swing for Homo erectus and/or Homo heidelbergensis and persists to more recent times.

-kbj

1 comment:

  1. Beautiful avian iconography! I'm curious to know if that specimen is free-standing. ~best

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